Making Predictions and Inferences

This education plan concentrates on making predications and making inferences when reading various texts. The essential concepts that all students will learn are students will understand how to make a prediction when reading a text and students will understand how to draw inferences when reading a text. The knowledge dimensions that apply to both learning concepts are conceptual, procedural, and metacognitive. As students use and gain this conceptual knowledge they will begin to understand the relationship among the basic elements within reading and the larger structure that enables them to function together. As students use and gain procedural knowledge they will begin to understand how to make predictions and inferences when reading various texts. The cognitive processes that students will use throughout this education plan are understanding, applying, and evaluating. As students use understanding as a cognitive process they will begin to learn and understand how to construct meaning from instructional messages, including oral, written, and graphic communication.

1. Where to begin
Learning Concepts:
1.) Understand how to make a prediction when reading a text
2.) Understand how to draw inferences when reading a text

Knowledge Dimensions: conceptual, procedural, metacognitive
Cognitive Processes: understand, apply, evaluating

Student Learning Outcomes:
1.) Students will explain a forthcoming event in a text.
2.) Students will recite, draw, or write their prediction of an event in a text.
3.) Students will monitor their reading comprehension by making a prediction in a text with the think-aloud strategy.
3.) Students will interpret main event of a text after reading by answering reflection questions.
4.) Students will use inferencing when answering comprehension questions.

Teacher Connection- Teacher is familiar with teaching comprehension strategies such as making predictions and making inferences.

2.) What is Differentiated?

Content (Readiness Skills)-
Use reading texts that reflect student interests at the student's instructional level.
The teacher will model how to make predictions when reading a selection using the think-aloud strategy.
The students need to show ther understanding of what a prediction and inference is through a pre-assessment inference worksheet .

Process
1.) The teacher will read a selection to the class and model how to make predictions using the think-aloud stategy. (I think that..., I wonder if..., etc.)
2.) Students will take a pre-assessment that measures there level of readiness for making predictions and inferences. (See above attached inference worksheet).
3.) Students will be divided into small groups of four or five students according to their readiness and schema demonstrated in the pre-assessment.
4.) Students will read a text at their instructional level in their small groups.
5.) Students will preview the text at the beginning by looking at the title, any pictures, read captions,etc and make predictions about the story using this information.
6.) Students will read the text and halfway through will stop and predict (pair share with a partner) what will happen next in the story.
7.) Students will finish reading the text and use their prediction skills to infer what will happen next in the text.
8.) Students will demonstrate their inference skills by either reciting, drawing, or writing what will happen next in the text using the Prediction/Infer Graphic organizer
9.) Graphic Organizer will be assessed.


Products-
Students will recite, draw, or write their prediction of a text using the above attached prediction/infer graphic organizer.

3.) What Are Student Needs?
Student Readiness-
Students will be given a pre-assessment using their prediction skills to infer. They will read a short story (a paragraph at the most) and use their prediction skills to infer what will happen next in a situational text. They will then recite, draw, or write an inference of a situational paragraph using prediction skills.

Student interest-
Students will be reading texts in small group according to their readiness. In order to determine readiness, students are given a pre-assessment that measures both prediction and inference skills.

Learning Profile-
Depending on data from the pre-assessment, students are divided into groups of four or five students. The readiness assessment will demonstrate the prior knowledge of students regarding prediction and inference skills. Also, the pre-assessment will determine the type of instruction (vocabulary, repeated modeling, etc) that each group will receive.

4.) How Will Students Learn?
The students will be divided into groups of four or five students according to their readiness determined by the pre-assessment.
Group #1 - Student answers had no schema related to swimming.
Group #2 - Student answers had some relation to swimming at the pool.
Group #3 - Student answers has some relation to swimming in the ocean.
Group #4 - Student answers show relevance to swimming in more than one settings (lake, ocean, pool, etc).

In small groups, students will read a text and use prediction skills to infer a forthcoming event in a text. Depending on ability, students will either draw, write, or recite their predictions/inferences.

Anchoring Activity- Students will reinforce their prediction skills by drawing or writing their predictions about what will happen next using a picture in the Prediction Skills Worksheet.

5.) Assessment
Student work will be assessed using the


Worksheets from http://www.havefunteaching.com/reading-worksheets/predictions
Some ideas used in rubric from
http://www.middleweb.com/ReadWrkshp/RWdownld/InferRubric2.pdf